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DECORATIVE PROCESSES

WEEKS 1&2

DECORATIVE PROCESSES

Definition: Decorative processes refer to the combination of some element’s of design and some sewing processes to make a finished garment beautiful.

These element’s of design includes the arrangement of line’s, shape, color as well as some fullnesses such as dart’s, pleats, gathering and shirring while sewing the garment. For instance, the use of a bias strip of fabric to create some vertical lines on a garment can make the finished article look more attractive. A contrasting color of satin fabric can be sewn at certain edges of a garment to make it look beautiful on the wearer. There for, all  decorating articles need  different  colour of   threads ( fabrics  /  beads)  e.t.c

The  rules to  observe while decorating a garment.

  1. A poor quality fabric does not need elaborate decorations.
  2. All decorations must be  worked on  a  well made garment.
  3. The decoration shold not weaken the  portion  of the garment  where  it is  worked.
  4. The decoration must suit the  dress  and  wearer  too
  5. The wrong side of the decora tfiom  should  be  as  neat  as the right  side
  6. The decorated  work  should  withstand  frequent  washing. This  means  that  the  decorated part should not fade due to  frequent  washing.

TYPES OF DECORATIVE PROCESSES

There are various types of Decorative processes. They include:

  1. EMBROIDERY STITCHES (DECORATIVE STITCHES): Is a stitch made with a threaded sewing needle through fabric by a dressmaker using hand to decorate a cloth.These can be worked on some under garments such as waist slip. Some of these stitches are:

(A) Chain stitches: It involves a series of loop stitches forming a chain-like pattern on a fabric. These are worked as single or double colored chain stitches.They give an appearance of even back stitch at the wrong side of the garment. Chain stitch is an example of a filling or an outline stitch.

Diagram:

 

Note: one stitch is holding another one.

(B) Satin stitches: A satin stitch is purely a filling stitch. It is worked inside a portion that is already marked.

Diagram:

 

 

(C) Stem stitch: This stitch also resembles back stitch at the wrong side. It is an outline stitch. A new stitch is worked where the last one ended.

 

Diagram:

 

(D) French knot: This is purely a filling stitch. It is mainly used for showing an emphasis on something such as a fruit on a tree.

Diagram:

2 APPLIQUE: This is the type of decoration whereby a beautiful motif (design) is cut out from  an article ànd  sewn  on  a side of garment. A glue (gum) is used to paste the motif while a slip stich or satin stitch is worked at it’s edges to strengthen the article.

Diagram:

3 FACED SCALLOPING: These are very deep curves created at some edges of the garments such as neckline, hemlinefor sleeves and skirt edges of children garment. They look like continous shaped facing. These deep curves should be covered with a similar shaped fabric to prevent fraying and the process is termed faced scalloping. The finished work appears very neat and attractive.

Diagram:

  1. FAGGOTING: This is the type of decoration used for joining two panels (i.e straight edges) especially on a rouleau loop. A rouleau loop may be a long skirt with a long cut opened at its centre. Then the edges of the open cut are worked to close the opening with a string or rope-like fabric. It creates a very beautiful effect called faggoting at the centre. This faggoting effect can also be created with some designed buttons and loops which are neatly arranged to close the opening in the long skirt.

Diagram:

  1. BRODERLIE ANGLAISE (English embroidery): These are decorations worked on cottton fabrics and other strong lingerie fabrics used as for underwears. The dress maker create some holes in the fabric which can be seen on lace fabrics. There are different shapes and sizes of the holes which are made with different tools in the fabric. For instance, square and traingular holes are made with a sharp scissors while round holes are cut with a stiletto. Then the edges of the cut shapes are sewn with some decorative stitches such as satin stitch, chain stitch and button hole stitch to prevent fraying and make the fabric very attractive.

Diagram:

  1. SHELL EDGING: This is also an attractive effect worked on very fine fabrics (i.e light fabric). The shells are worked on straight edges of fabric and when making frills (i.e small folds on the edges). These shells are made by folding the fabric and passing threaded needle to tie the size of the shell needed. It is worked from right to left.

 

 

Diagram:

  1. BEADS AND SEQUINS: pizza different sizes and shapes as well as different colours. Seconds are very light in weight but look shiny. There are all sewn to the garment for beautification.
  2. LACE EDGING: a beautiful lace can be applied at the hem to decorate it. It is also used as a false hem. A false hem is a strip of fabric attached at the hem of a dress and folded to the wrong side of the fabric and sewn neatly. In the case of using the lace for edging, it may not be folded to the wrong side since it is used for decoration.
  3. SMOCKING: this is a decorative method of controlling fullness. They are sewn on a guarded fullness at an even distance. It can also be used as collar.
  4. DECORATIVE MACHINE STITCHES: these are some cities which are carefully work to appear very attractive, example sewn on a collar.
  5. SHADOW WORK: a motif (design) is drawn at the wrong side of the light fabric. The shape of the motif is highlighted with beautiful stitches at the right side of the dress.
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